Grape varieties

Viognier

Viognier

Viognier is a full bodied white wine, originating in France. It is appreciated for its perfumed aromas of peach, tangerine and honeysuckle. It can be aged in oak barrels, giving it a creamy taste with a hint of vanilla.
The palate of the Viognier varies between the soft tastes of tangerine, mango, honeysuckle, to the creamier vanilla, nutmeg and clove. Depending on the producer and the production method, it will vary in intensity, lightly with some gas, from a bitter touch tom bold and creamy. Usually, Viognier is less acid, lighter and more fragrant than Chardonnay.
The wines are typically dry, although some producers make a wine which is a little less dry, intensifying the peach aroma of the Viognier. Wines produced with the Viognier grape almost always cause a greasy sensation in the middle of the tongue. The drier types are less fruity and possess a slight bitterness.
The alcoholic content of Viognier varies between 13,5% and 15%, which does not seem to be of much difference. However, these two extremes are very different in taste, and are like two completely different wines. The Viognier with 14% of alcohol content is lighter and simpler.
For a richer, bolder and fruitier kind of wine, choose one with a higher alcohol content.
The Viognier grape produces better wines when grown in sunny regions, with moderate temperatures, cool nights, or near a body of water, in order to maintain its acidity.
The trick to match food to Viognier wine is in completely respecting its floral notes and medium acidity. In this way, the focus can be on embellishing and expanding the fundamental aromas of the wine, making sure the food will not be too heavy or acidic. The aromas on the plate should make the creamy and fruity aromas of the wine stand out.